MUSHROOM GROWING SOFTWARE for traceability & GROWING ROOM MANAGEMENT

Mushroom farming software for gourmet mushroom growing

MUSHROOM TRACEABILITY HAS NEVER BEEN EASIER

Perform recalls in seconds, with full confidence of accuracy and reliability.  Trace product back to a grow room (eg: Oyster mushroom Crop 123 from Room 12 including grow room harvest date, spawn, incubation, fruiting and harvest details), batch/patch and all input materials and their related suppliers & batch/lot details.    Optionally use farmsoft Post Harvest to trace gourmet mushrooms up the supply chain through transport to customer delivery.

EASY PLANNING, LOWER COSTS

Planning is easy with automatic grow room task creation to guide teams through the mushroom growing process. Schedule & plan entire mushroom batches weeks or even months in advance with just a few clicks!   Reduce admin costs by collecting data in natural businss processes during the mushroom growing proces, reducing the cost of traceability and monitoring, delivering reporting without needing to compile spread sheets manually.

BEST MUSHROOM GROWING PRACTICES

Grow room tasks can be created automatically, you check their accuracy and easily adjust them if growing progress doesn't match the best practice. The farming team is guided through grow room tasks ensuring jobs are done at the correct time using correct materials, and compliance data is captured at every critical point ensuring maximum mushroom quality and yield.

PASS MUSHROOM GROWING AUDITS WITH EASE

Have the confidence that you can do instant recalls for your mushroom growing operation, generate any traceability, grow room summaries, and grow room details in a matter of seconds.  Reduce compliance costs and ensure the profitability of your mushroom growing business.  Enforce mushroom growing compliance for many international standards.

AUTOMATIC BUDGETS & COST MONITORING

View costs in real time, down to an individual batch in one grow room.   Never have production cost shocks again. Budgets are automatically created by the best practice system and allow projections for any period of time into the future, detailed to each grow room batch and the individual inventory that is needed for each batch of mushrooms.

OPTIONAL INTEGRATION WITH POST HARVEST MUSHROOM PACKING SOFTWARE

Optionally use farmsoft Post Harvest mushroom packing solutions that seamlessly integrate with the farming software for a complete enterprise management solution. Learn more here.

mushroom growing software.  MORE YIELD

WE HIDE ANY FEATURES YOU DON'T NEED

SIMPLE MUSHROOM GROWING SOLUTION, OR COMPREHENSIVE ENTERPRISE MANAGEMENT

CLOUD ENABLED (optional)

PREMISE BASED, LOCAL INSTALLATION (optional)

OPTIONS

Training, project management, support, dedicated consultant 

CAN BE TAILORED TO MATCH YOUR EXACT REQUIREMENTS 

Intro mushroom growing video

Implement a simple traceability solution, or comprehensive enterprise management solution for mushroom growing – the choice is yours….  

Detailed mushroom growing software demo

Ok, this is really detailed, if you watch this - you will become a farmsoft expert!   You can see how common business processes are supported by farmsoft.  farmsoft is flexible, and there are serveral ways to do everything - giving you the choice to choose the best processes for your business. 

Want more details?  Download the detailed product specifications here

MUSHROOM GROWING SOLUTION - MORE QUALITY - MORE YIELD

FREE LIVE DEMO

Permaculture mushroom farming methods:

A simple mushroom/permaculture/fungiculture growing method:

1. Spawn and substrate: Use a spawn to start the culture. You can produce your own spawn using a sterile culture, or you can buy ready-to-inoculate spawn, which are carried by suppliers. Producing your own can be cheaper in the long run, but the start-up costs can be high, so chances are buying the ready-to-inoculate spawn is the way to go for you. Substrate: Many growers use straw or wood chips. Straw is generally the preferred method. You want straw that can be chopped up into little pieces.

2. Prepare substrate: Chop straw into short pieces. Wet the straw. Heat the straw in boiling water. Continue boiling for half an hour and then remove the straw and drain it. Spread out the straw on clean surface and let cool down.

3. Pack plastic bags: Pack plastic bags with straw and spawn. Pack two or three inches of straw into the plastic bag and then lightly sprinkle the spawn on top. Repeat this until you’ve almost filled the bag, close the top and poke holes in the bag.

4. Incubation: Keep growing area around 78 degrees F. Place bags on shelving unit. Stop any threats of natural light getting into growing room. Use a red “darkroom” light when you need to check on your bags. When you start to notice tiny pinhead mushrooms near the air holes in your bag, then you’re ready to move on to the next step.

5. Fruiting: For your fruiting room, you need a high level of humidity. The temperature will need to be 65 to 70 degrees F. Unlike the incubation room, you’ll actually need a lot of natural light—at least 12 hours a day. To shock your mycelium, which will force it into fruiting, move the bags to a cool place for a day, such as a basement or other cool place, and then move them back to the fruiting room. Next, cut away the bag, which allows mushroom growth to take place.

6. Harvest: Just before your mushroom caps are fully uncurled, that’s when it’s time to harvest. To do so, twist the stem off as near to the growing block as you are able to. You’ve now harvested your mushrooms. To learn all the basics of growing oyster mushrooms, read Growing Gourmet Mushrooms For Profit.

Fungiculture farming methods

Mushrooms are not plants, and require different conditions for optimal growth. Plants develop through photosynthesis, a process that converts atmospheric carbon dioxide into carbohydrates, especially cellulose. While sunlight provides an energy source for plants, mushrooms derive all of their energy and growth materials from their growth medium, through biochemical decomposition processes. This does not mean that light is an irrelevant requirement, since some fungi use light as a signal for fruiting.[1][2] However, all the materials for growth must already be present in the growth medium. Mushrooms grow well at relative humidity levels of around 95–100%, and substrate moisture levels of 50 to 75%.[1]

Instead of seeds, mushrooms reproduce asexually through spores. Spores can be contaminated with airborne microorganisms, which will interfere with mushroom growth and prevent a healthy crop.

Mycelium, or actively growing mushroom culture, is placed on a substrate—usually sterilized grains such as rye or millet—and induced to grow into those grains. This is called inoculation. Inoculated grains are referred to as spawn. Spores are another inoculation option, but are less developed than established mycelium. Since they are also contaminated easily, they are only manipulated in laboratory conditions with a laminar flow cabinet.