farmsoft
Food service / food manufacturing
Food service / food manufacturing is made easy with farmsoft! Easily manage orders, production scheduling, packing, picking, shipping, purchase orders, costs, traceability, quality control, audits & recall.

Food service / food manufacturing

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[POST HARVEST BROCHURE]   [RFID]   [FARM MANAGEMENT]

Manufacture food & food service products with ease.

Implement farmsoft Post Harvest solution for an easy to use manufacturing solution that manages food safety from the moment you place a purchase order, to post sales analysis. Complete management of the entire business includes purchasing raw materials, orders, manufacturing JIT to fill orders, shipping, inventory, sales, profit analysis and more...

food manufacturing / food service
Food service / food manufacturing

Manage production with ease

Rapidly select the orders that will be fulfilled by the manufacturing process, assign a line & inventory manager. farmsoft will send alerts to the line and inventory managers with details of the raw materials (fresh produce, ingredients, packaging materials etc.) allowing them to rapidly commence manufacturing/packing/processing.

Infinite food processing batches

Often by-products from one batch can be re-used in another batch. You can do this an unlimited number of times in farmsoft while maintaining traceability, accountability, and inventory accuracy.

Batch cost & profitability

Monitor the cost of each batch of food manufactured, its profitability, cost & profit by product line/unit, and profitability of shipping goods to each customers distribution center (each distribution center can have different shipping costs).

Food service / food manufacturing


Rapid and accurate shipping

Your farmsoft Post Harvest solution guides shipping teams to quickly find the correct inventory for each order, ensures each order is filled with 100% accuracy, and automatically maintains 100% traceability. Customers, sales team, shipping companies can be sent shipping notifications and invoices automatically. Your farmsoft even automatically generates and emails invoices and your choice of shipping documents to your choice of customers.

Flexible for all food manufacturing

Use farmsoft to manage simple value adding processes like producing cut vegetables and fruit for food service industries (eg: sliced / diced onion, frozen cut potato fries, salad mixes, coleslaw), or more complicated processes such as IQF pizza, fruit juice blends and more.

Instant audits, mock recall, and recall

Traceability is something you never need to spend time on with farmsoft managing everything automatically. Impress auditors with instant mock recalls both up and down the supply chain.

food manufacturing / food service
food manufacturing / food service

Reduce waste in the food manufacturing process

Using farmsoft Post Harvest Business management solutions; team members are guided through their processes to ensure precision inventory raw materials are used in the food manufacturing process to deliver high quality food, without over or under production which can result in waste or spoilage.

Use farmsoft in primary food processing

Primary food processing turns agricultural products, such as raw wheat kernels or livestock, into something that can eventually be eaten. This category includes ingredients that are produced by ancient processes such as drying, threshing, winnowing and milling grain, shelling nuts, and butchering animals for meat. It also includes de-boning and cutting meat, freezing and smoking fish and meat, extracting and filtering oils, canning food, preserving food through food irradiation, and candling eggs, as well as homogenizing and pasteurizing milk.

Contamination and spoilage problems in primary food processing can lead to significant public health threats, as the resulting foods are used so widely.  However, many forms of processing contribute to improved food safety and longer shelf life before the food spoils.  Commercial food processing uses control systems such as hazard analysis and critical control points (HACCP) and failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) to reduce the risk of harm.

Use farmsoft in secondary food processing

Secondary food processing is the everyday process of creating food from ingredients that are ready to use. Baking bread, regardless of whether it is made at home, in a small bakery, or in a large factory, is an example of secondary food processing.  Fermenting fish and making wine, beer, and other alcoholic products are traditional forms of secondary food processing. Sausages are a common form of secondary processed meat, formed by grinding of meat that has already undergone primary processing.  Most of the secondary food processing methods known to human kind are commonly described as cooking methods.

Use farmsoft in tertiary food processing

Tertiary food processing is the commercial production of what is commonly called processed food.  These are ready-to-eat or heat-and-serve foods, such as TV dinners and re-heated airline meals.

food manufacturing / food service
food manufacturing / food service

Food manufacturing: A background

Workers in the food manufacturing industry link farmers and other agricultural producers with consumers. They do this by processing raw fruits, vegetables, grains, meats, and dairy products into finished goods ready for the grocer or wholesaler to sell to households, restaurants, or institutional food services.

Food manufacturing workers perform tasks as varied as the many foods we eat. For example, they slaughter, dress, and cut meat or poultry; process milk, cheese, and other dairy products; can and preserve fruits, vegetables, and frozen specialties; manufacture flour, cereal, pet foods, and other grain mill products; make bread, cookies, cakes, and other bakery products; manufacture sugar and candy and other confectionery products; process shortening, margarine, and other fats and oils; and prepare packaged seafood, coffee, potato and corn chips, and peanut butter. Although this list is long, it is not exhaustive. Food manufacturing workers also play a part in delivering numerous other food products to our tables.

Quality control and quality assurance are vital to this industry. The U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Food Safety and Inspection Service branch oversees all aspects of food manufacturing. In addition, other food safety programs have been adopted as issues of chemical and bacterial contamination and new food-borne pathogens remain a public health concern. For example, a food safety program called Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point focuses on identifying hazards and preventing them from contaminating food in early stages of meat processing by applying science-based controls to the testing of food products—from their raw materials to the finished products. The program relies on individual processing plants developing and implementing safety measures along with a system to intercept potential contamination points, which is then subject to USDA inspections.

Contact us for your nearest farmsoft fresh produce packing / food manufacturing consultant in your region: USA, Canada, UK, Australia, New Zeland, Africa.

Cyber Risks to food processing and manufacturing?

The Food Protection and Defense Institute (FPDI) at the University of Minnesota protects the global food supply through research, education, and the delivery of innovative solutions. It addresses vulnerabilities of the global food system through a comprehensive, farm-to-table view, partnering with industry, government, NGO/IGO, and academic stakeholders to help assure product integrity, supply chain resiliency, and brand protection throughout the food system.

Since 2016, the Food Protection and Defense Institute (FPDI) has conducted several projects to understand the cybersecurity risk to food industry ICSs and develop food industry-specific guidance and solutions. At convenings of cybersecurity and food experts from industry, government, and academia, FPDI has identified some of the key contributors to the food industry’s cybersecurity risk environment as well as key action steps food companies can take to protect themselves.

The overarching, most important step is for companies to extend their food safety and food defense culture to cybersecurity, always remembering that insecure = unsafe.

Click here for the Sept 2019 report.


Food manufactures under pressure from consumers, retailers

Food manufactures are under ever-increasing pressure from consumers and retailers to improve food quality and safety against a backdrop of growing cost pressures and tighter margins.

Click here to view the video report.

In response, food manufacturers are doing the right thing, becoming more efficient and improving food safety. Incremental gains will not be enough, however, and disruptive technologies will deliver the step change required for manufacturers to secure their future.

Like the automotive industry, over the next decade food factories will change dramatically because of disruptive technologies, with major implications for the whole supply chain.

Food Manufacturing 4.0 has arrived. Highly flexible “lights-out” manufacturing will enable the production of new products while intelligent product tracking will improve food safety and traceability.

Smart factories connected to the industrial internet will react to changing consumer demand at an incredible pace.

To find out more about disruptive food manufacturing visit oalgroup.com.

Source: telegraph.co.uk

Making the most of food & increasing yield optimization

In order to meet the global population’s growing demand for food, research by the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations (FAO) predicts that the worldwide food manufacturing and processing industries need to increase their total output by 70 per cent by 2050.


With the rise in the planet’s population of around 60 million people per year, it is an issue that cannot be ignored.


There are several ways, each with varying degrees of difficulty, to enhance the efficiency of food production.


These include tackling climate change, increasing the availability and fertility of land and improving the supply of water. However, an important element of food production which must be addressed immediately is the further optimization of crop yields as it will be a hugely significant factor in ensuring the 2050 target is met.

Food service / food manufacturing
Food service / food manufacturing



Whilst tackling climate change, improving the quality and fertility of arable land and supplying water will all take time, increases in food sorting efficiencies are possible now. This can be done by utilizing the latest available food sorting technologies and machines, which deliver greater yields, enhanced profitability for processors and, importantly, advanced knowledge from data which can be used further along the processing line.


It is important to recognize that, in addition to the demand for more food, the desire for choice and variety is also growing. This is especially the case in developing countries that are adopting western, middle-class consumption habits such as the desire for a greater variety of food types and outlets in which food is served and consumed.


As people move away from traditional home cooked meals, the demand for convenience food and ready-meals is increasing, bringing with it opportunities to benefit but also obstacles to overcome.


For instance, an average French fry plant produces 140.000 tons of French fries per year. By increasing yields by as little as 0.5 per cent through modern sorting technologies and techniques, a processor could take an estimated 90 truck-loads off the roads.


This action, which has positive repercussions for the environment as a whole, will increase the availability of raw material and boost profitability.


It is important to highlight that this principle can be extended and implemented in all areas of food production.



Roel Molenaers


This is especially relevant since the United States Department for Agriculture (USDA) recently claimed that 31 per cent of American-grown food was not available for human consumption at retail and consumer levels. With a commitment to yield optimization, industries can help minimize this waste.


In terms of volume, the same report stated that over 51 million tons of food was lost in America. In monetary terms, this waste represented over $161bn (€145.3bn) as purchased at retail prices.


To help overcome this, the food sorting industry is investing in its technological development to ensure that efficiencies continue to be made. For example, the TOMRA 5B sorting machine is a system that not only sorts to customers’ specifications, but also provides them with an increasing supply of data and easy-to-interpret statistics which can be used to improve future yields.


TOMRA’s smart surround view can reduce false rejections by 20 per cent, increasing exponentially the amount of good, final, end product and, in turn, limiting waste.


The ability to efficiently sort vegetables, potatoes and nuts – which represent over 19 per cent of the total amount of food wasted in the United States alone – could have a huge impact. By increasing yields by just one per cent, it is possible to increase the final amount of this type of produce in the US by 11 million tons. Apply this on a global scale and the 2050 food level objective starts to look more achievable.


The improvement in yield enhancing technology is not simply about ensuring food can be used for its initial purpose, it also identifies what produce can find its way into the food chain with an alternative use.


These improvements, as delivered by the TOMRA 5B sorting machine, will result in produce that would once have been identified as waste being recovered. A food type that does not make the grade for sale in its original form can be recouped for the creation of potato flakes, tomato sauces or other alternatives. It can also be sold as a grade B product, ensuring that waste is reduced at every stage of the process.

Food service / food manufacturing
Food service / food manufacturing


Developments in technologies, such as a 360-degree surround view of the produce for optimal inspection, combined with innovative detection and rejection technology, result in more valid decisions about the quality of the product. This technological progress not only improves the quantity of food available, it also maintains the high levels of quality expected by consumers who are increasingly interested in what they are purchasing.


Alongside this, the population growth of developing nations - especially those in Sub-Saharan Africa which, according to the FAO, is expected to grow by up to 108 per cent - means that plans for improved yields in these economies must be tackled sooner rather than later.


The use of ever-improving technology to directly increase yields is a move in the right direction. However, the next generation of food sorting machines will be able to provide vital information which will not only increase yields, but also look at improvements further down the production line and in future seasons.


If a food processor was to notice depressions in yield in a particular area of the process, the results taken from the sorting machine could create a solution to easily identify and form actions earlier in the food growing

process. Armed with this data, food processors are able to formulate plans to overcome present issues.


If the world is to meet the expected demands for food by 2050, and to make further improvements as the population continues to grow beyond that date, it must tackle the issue of improving yields quickly. By investing in sorting technologies and machines, food manufacturers and processors will be able to not only satisfy the need for increased volumes of product, but also increase their revenues.


To support this, food sorting technology developers will continue to refine their systems to enable greater access to increasingly accurate data and provide more capable machines to reduce waste to an absolute

minimum.


The outlook should be regarded as a positive one. The assistant director general of FAO, Hafez Ghanem, said that his organization is “cautiously optimistic about the world’s potential to feed itself by 2050”. With

continued developments in food sorting technology, it has every reason to be.


By Roel Molenaers, head of product management, TOMRA Sorting Food.


For more information:

Catherine Hechter

TOMRA Sorting Food

Tel:+32 (0)16 742 817

catherine.Hechter@tomra.com

www.tomra.com/food

Food manufactures under pressure from consumers, retailers

Food manufactures are under ever-increasing pressure from consumers and retailers to improve food quality and safety against a backdrop of growing cost pressures and tighter margins.

Click here to view the video report.

In response, food manufacturers are doing the right thing, becoming more efficient and improving food safety. Incremental gains will not be enough, however, and disruptive technologies will deliver the step change required for manufacturers to secure their future.

Like the automotive industry, over the next decade food factories will change dramatically because of disruptive technologies, with major implications for the whole supply chain.

Food Manufacturing 4.0 has arrived. Highly flexible “lights-out” manufacturing will enable the production of new products while intelligent product tracking will improve food safety and traceability.

Smart factories connected to the industrial internet will react to changing consumer demand at an incredible pace.

To find out more about disruptive food manufacturing visit oalgroup.com.

Source: telegraph.co.uk

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