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Fruit & vegetable canning process for food manufacturers
Jam marmalade fruit jelly preserve production process made easy, users are guided through the jelly manufacturing processes to ensure minimum food waste and maximum quality of manufactured jelly.

Jam marmalade jelly preserve production process

Jam marmalade fruit jelly preserve production process made easy, users are guided through the jelly manufacturing processes to ensure minimum food waste and maximum quality of manufactured jelly.

Jam and Jelly

Jams and jellies are spreads typically made from fruit, sugar, and pectin. Jelly is made with the juice of the fruit; jam uses the meat of the fruit as well. Some vegetable jellies are also produced.

Background

It is difficult to pinpoint when people first made a fruit spread. Ancient civilizations were known to set a variety of foods in the sun to dry in order to preserve them for later use. One of the first recorded mentions of jam making dates to the Crusades whose soldiers brought the process back from their journeys in the Middle East.

Preserving foods was a home-based operation until the nineteenth century. Even today, millions of people make fruit preserves in their own kitchens. Whether in the home kitchen or in a modern food processing plants, the procedure is essentially the same. Fruits are chopped and cooked with sugar and pectin until a gel is formed. The jam or jelly is then packed into sterilized jars.

Spoilage prevention is a major concern for both the home and the commercial jam producer. An important innovation in food preservation occurred in 1810. Nicolas Appert, a French confectioner, determined that by filling jars to the brim with food so that all air is expressed out and then placing the jars in boiling water would prevent spoilage.

In the early 1800s in the United States, the country was experiencing a surge westward. Of the many legendary characters to emerge during this period was John Chapman, better known as Johnny Appleseed. A nursery-man from western Pennsylvania, Chapman walked through the Midwest planting apple orchards. His purpose was to provide crops for the coming pioneers.

One of those pioneers was Jerome Smucker of Ohio who used Chapman's apples to open a cider mill in 1897. Within a few years, he was also making apple butter. Smucker blended the apple butter in a copper kettle over a wood stove. He and his wife ladled the apple butter into stoneware crocks. She then sold it to other housewives near their home in Wayne County, Ohio.

Fifty years earlier in Concord, Massachusetts, Ephraim Wales Bull finally achieved his goal of cultivating the perfect grape. His rich-tasting Concord grape became enormously popular. In 1869, Dr. Thomas Branwell Welch used the Concord grape to launch his grape juice company. When, in 1918, Welch's company made its first jam product, Grapelade, the United States Army bought the entire inventory. The company's trademark Concord grape jelly debuted in 1923.

After World War II, food scientists developed the process of aseptic canning: heating the food and the jar or can separately. For sensitive foods such as fruits, this allowed for high-temperature flash cooking that preserved taste and nutritional value.

When sugar prices soared in the early 1970s, high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) became a popular substitute. Several major food processing companies, including Archer Daniels Midland, Amstar CPC International, Cargill, H.J. Heinz, and Anheuser Busch opened HCFS plants.

Raw Materials

Jams and jellies are made from a variety of fruits, either singly or in combination. Most of the fruits are harvested in the fall. The level of ripeness varies. Pears, peaches, apricots, strawberries, and raspberries gel best if picked slightly underripe. Plums and cherries are best if picked when just ripe. The fruit is purchased from farmers. Most jam and jelly producers develop close relationships with their growers in order to ensure quality. The production plants are built close to the fruit farms so that the time elapsed between harvest and preparation is between 12-24 hours.

Sugar or high fructose corn syrup, or a combination of the two are added to the fruit to sweeten it. Cane sugar chips are the ideal type of sugar used for preserving fruit. Granulated and beet sugar tend to crystallize. Sugar is purchased from an outside supplier. High fructose corn syrup is processed by fermenting cornstarch. It is purchased from an outside supplier

The element that allows fruit to gel, pectin is present in varying degrees in all fruit. Apples, blackberries, cherries, citrus fruits, grapes, quinces, and cranberries have the best natural gelling properties. Strawberries and apricots are low in pectin. Jams made from such fruits are either blended with fruits high in pectin, or extra sugar is added to the mixture. Sometimes pectin is extracted industrially from dried apples.

Citric acid is added to obtain the correct balance needed to produce the jam or jelly. Lime and lemon juice are high in citric acid, therefore they are the most prevalent source used. Citric acid can also be obtained by the fermentation of sugars. It is purchased from outside suppliers.

Other flavorings, such as vanilla, cinnamon, mint, alcoholic beverages such as rum or Kirsch, can be added to the jam or jelly. These flavorings are purchased from outside suppliers.

The Manufacturing
Process

The ingredients must be added in carefully measured amounts. Ideally, they should be combined in the following manner: 1% pectin, 65% sugar, and an acid concentration of pH 3.1. Too much pectin will make the spread too hard, too much sugar will make it too sticky.

Inspection

  • 1 When the fruit arrives at the plant, it is inspected for quality, using color, ripeness, and taste as guides. Fruit that passes inspection is loaded into a funnel-shaped hopper that carries the fruit into pipes for cleaning and crushing.

Cleaning, crushing, and chopping

  • 2 As the fruit travels through the pipes, a gentle water spray clears away surface dirt. Depending on whether the finished product is to be jam or jelly, paddles push the fruit and or just its juice through small holes, leaving stems and any other excess debris behind. Some fruits, such as citrus and apples may be manually peeled, cored, sliced and diced. Cherries may be soaked and then pitted before being crushed.

Pasteurizing the fruit

  • 3 The fruit and/or juice continues through another set of pipes to cooking vats. Here, it is heated to just below the boiling point (212° F [100° C]) and then immediately chilled to just below freezing (32° F [0° C]). This process, pasteurization, prevents spoilage. For jelly, the pulp is forced through another set of small openings that holds back seeds and skin. It will often then be passed through a dejuicer or filter. The juice or fruit is transferred to large refrigerated tanks and then pumped to cooking kettles as needed.

Cooking the jam and jelly

  • 5 Premeasured amounts of fruit and/or juice, sugar, and pectin are blended in industrial cooking kettles. The mixtures are usually cooked and cooled three times. If additional flavorings are to be included, they are added at this point. When the mixture reaches the predetermined thickness and sweetness, it is pumped to filling machines.

Filling the jars

  • 6 Presterilized jars move along a conveyer belt as spouts positioned above pour premeasured amounts of jam or jelly into them.
When the fruit arrives at the plant, it is inspected for quality, using color, ripeness, and taste as guides. Fruit that passes inspection is cleaned, crushed, and pasteurized. Next, the premeasured mixture is cooked with added sugar and pectin until it reaches the appropriate thickness and taste. Then it is vacuum-packed in jars and labeled.
  • When the fruit arrives at the plant, it is inspected for quality, using color, ripeness, and taste as guides. Fruit that passes inspection is cleaned, crushed, and pasteurized. Next, the premeasured mixture is cooked with added sugar and pectin until it reaches the appropriate thickness and taste. Then it is vacuum-packed in jars and labeled.
  • Metal caps are then vacuumed sealed on top. The process of filling the jars and vacuum packing them forces all of the air out of the jars further insuring the sterility of the product.

Labeling and packaging

  • 7 The sealed jars are conveyed to a machine that affix preprinted labels. According to law, these labels must list truthful and specific information about the contents. The jars are then packed into cartons for shipment. Depending on the size of the producer's operation, labeling and packaging is either achieved mechanically or manually.

Quality Control

In the United States, food processing regulations require than jams and jellies are made with 45 parts fruit or juice to 55 parts sugar. The federal Food and Drug Administration (FDA) mandates that all heat-processed canned foods must be free of live microorganisms. Therefore, processing plants keep detailed lists of cooking times and temperatures, which are checked periodically by the FDA.

Requirements also exist for the cleanliness of the workplace and workers. Producers install numerous quality control checks at all points in the preparation process, testing for taste, color and consistency.

The Future

Because it is a relatively simple process, the production of jams and jellies is not expected to change dramatically. What is apparent is that new flavors will be introduced. Certain vegetable jellies such as pepper and tomato have been marketed successfully. Other, more exotic types including garlic jelly are also appearing on grocery shelves.

Where to Learn More

Books

Coyle, L. Patrick. The World Encyclopedia of Food. New York: Facts on File, 1982.

Lang, Jenifer Harvey, ed. Larousse Gastronomique. New York: Crown, reprinted 1998.

Trager, James. The Food Chronology. New York: Henry Holt, 1995.

Periodicals

Anusasananan, Linda Lau. "Why?" Sunset (June 1996): 142.

Kawatski, Deanna. "Canning: a modest miracle." Mother Earth News (August-September 1996): 52.

Other

J.M. Smucker Co. 1999. http:/www.smucker.com/ (June 28, 1999).

Welch's Co. http://www.welchs.com/ (June 28, 1999).


JAM, JELLY, AND PRESERVES MARKET:

The Global Jam, Jelly, and Preserves Market is segmented on the basis of Type (Jams, Jellies, Marmalade, and Preserves), Distribution Channel (Hypermarket/Supermarket, Convenience Stores, Online Retail and Other Distribution Channels), and Geography.

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Jam, Jelly, Preserves: Market Snapshot

jelly marketJam marmalade jelly preserve manufacturing
Jam marmalade jelly preserve manufacturing

Jam marmalade jelly preserve manufacturing
Jam marmalade jelly preserve manufacturing

Jam, Jelly, Preserves:  Market Overview

The global jam, jelly, and preserves market is projected to register a CAGR of 3.6%, during the forecast period (2019-2024).

  • Jams, jellies, and preserves are experiencing an increasing demand, all over the world. In regions, like Europe and North America, these products are consumed on a daily basis, by consumers of all age groups. Jams, jellies and preserves have become a part of their daily meals.
  • The rising health issues, such as obesity, diabetes, and others, and the availability of other kinds of spreads in the market are the major restraints.
  • As a result, consumers are demanding for jams, jellies, and preserves that are fortified, contain low fat, low sugar, and possess other health-promoting properties.
  • Owing to the increasing demand for clean-label ingredients, there is an increase in the usage of natural and organic ingredients, in the preparation of jams, jellies, and preserves.

The global jam, jelly, and preserves market is segmented on the basis of type, into jams, jellies, marmalade and preserves. By distribution channel, the market is segmented into hypermarket/supermarket, convenience stores, online retail, and other distribution channels. The report also provides a geographical analysis of the market.

Key Jam, Jelly, Preserve Market Trends

Demand for reduced sugar/fat spreads

Regular jams contain huge quantities of sugar, which helps improve shelf-life, taste, and mouth-feel. However, with the rising health concerns, sugar is being replaced with alternatives, such as artificial sweeteners, fruit concentrates, and others, for the preparation of low-sugar and sugar-free jams, jellies, and preserves. With low-carb and low-fat diets trending across the world, the consumers are continuously looking out for healthier and tastier, convenient food options, like jams, jellies, and preserves, that are low in sugar and fat. Moreover, fruits, such as raspberries and blueberries, are being infused with special ingredients, such as spices, herbs, honey, and chia seeds, among others, in order to produce low-sugar and sugar-free jams, jellies, and preserves.

Jam, Jelly, and Preserves Market
Jam marmalade jelly preserve manufacturing

North America is the largest market for Jam, Jelly, and Preserves:

The North American jam, jelly, and preserves market is expected to register a CAGR of 2.8%, during the forecast period (2019-2024). The increasing demand for convenient foods has boosted the market for jam, jelly and preserves. It has been obseerved that the jam, jelly, and preserve makers in North America are using ripe as well as semi-ripe fruits and sugar alternatives, like pectin, to make their products more colorful and tastier. There is an increased demand for healthy, nutritious, innovative, and organically produced jams, jellies, and preserves, in the North American region. A recent trend, that has been observed in the market, is a shift from the normal sweet jams, jellies, and preserves, to other variants, like sweet and spicy, sweet and smoky, and sweet and tangy, among other flavors.

Jam, Jelly, and Preserves
Jam marmalade jelly preserve manufacturing

To understand geography trends, Download Sample Report.

Jam, Jelly, Preserve:  Competitive Landscape

The global jam, jelly, and preserves market is highly competitive with the presence of key players such as The J.M. Smucker Company, Orkla, Andros Group, B&G Foods, Inc. The market also witnesses the presence of various small and regional players. The players compete, in order to hold the major market share, by expanding their portfolios through product innovations, such as incorporating healthy ingredients and introducing new flavors.

Major Players

  1. B&G Foods, Inc.
  2. The J.M. Smucker Company
  3. F. Duerr & Sons Ltd
  4. Andros Group
  5. Orkla
Jam marmalade jelly preserve manufacturing
Jam marmalade jelly preserve manufacturing

Jam, Jelly, Preserve Manufacturing

5. MARKET SEGMENTATION

  1. 5.1 By Product Type
  2. 5.1.1 Jams
  3. 5.1.2 Jellies
  4. 5.1.3 Marmalade and Preserves
  5. 5.2 By Distribution Channel
  6. 5.2.1 Supermarkets/Hypermarkets
  7. 5.2.2 Convenience Stores
  8. 5.2.3 Online Retail
  9. 5.2.4 Other Distribution Channels
  10. 5.3 Geography
  11. 5.3.1 North America
  12. 5.3.1.1 United States
  13. 5.3.1.2 Canada
  14. 5.3.1.3 Mexico
  15. 5.3.1.4 Rest of North America
  16. 5.3.2 Europe
  17. 5.3.2.1 United Kingdom
  18. 5.3.2.2 Germany
  19. 5.3.2.3 France
  20. 5.3.2.4 Spain
  21. 5.3.2.5 Italy
  22. 5.3.2.6 Russia
  23. 5.3.2.7 Rest of Europe
  24. 5.3.3 Asia Pacific
  25. 5.3.3.1 China
  26. 5.3.3.2 Japan
  27. 5.3.3.3 India
  28. 5.3.3.4 Australia
  29. 5.3.3.5 Rest of Asia-Pacific
  30. 5.3.4 South America
  31. 5.3.4.1 Brazil
  32. 5.3.4.2 Argentina
  33. 5.3.4.3 Rest of South America
  34. 5.3.5 Middle East and Africa
  35. 5.3.5.1 South Africa
  36. 5.3.5.2 United Arab Emirates
  37. 5.3.5.3 Rest of Middle East and Africa
  38. 6. COMPETITIVE LANDSCAPE
  39. 6.1 Most Active Companies
  40. 6.2 Most Adopted Strategies
  41. 6.3 Market Share Analysis
  42. 6.4 Company Profiles
  43. 6.4.1 B&G Foods, Inc.
  44. 6.4.2 The J.M. Smucker Company
  45. 6.4.3 Andros Group
  46. 6.4.4 F. Duerr & Sons Ltd
  47. 6.4.5 Orkla
  48. 6.4.6 Wilkin & Sons Ltd.
  49. 6.4.7 Unilever
  50. 6.4.8 Murphy Orchards

Jam, Squash, Jellies, Marmalade or Fruit Paste processing


Jam Squash Jellies Marmalade or Fruit Paste processing

Making fruit pastes with a high percentage of sugar concentration is a traditional way of naturally preserving and storing fruit. A high concentration of sugar slows the generation of microorganisms, and the boiling process pasteurizes the fruit - extending its shelf life.


Jam, Squash, Jellies, Marmalade and Fruit Paste factories require complex operations. Strict quality control and regulations are enforced and need to be adhered to for the product to be distributed to the mass market.

Fruit pulps and other fruit side products resulting from the production of juices can be used for Jam, Squash, Jellies, Marmalade making.

Manufacturers of Jam, Squash, Jellies and Marmalade usually buy fruit concentrates in industrial packages. There are some but few that produce them straight from fresh fruit processing.

As a general rule the process consists of boiling fresh and/or pre-cooked fruits or pulp with a high concentration of sugar and pectin. Citric acid can also be added to further preserve the product and extend its shelf life. A high percentage of water has to be evaporated to form the highly concentrated paste, and ingredients have to be mixed rigorously in the mixing units before being pasteurized and then filled and packed. Hot filling is the technology that is most commonly used for packaging purposes.

Machine Engineering installs complete plants and process for the production of Jam, Squash, Jellies and Marmalade. Although each plant is individually designed to meet customers’ needs and product requirements, as a general rule the typical manufacturing plant for Jam, Squash, Jellies and Marmalade contains the following equipment:

  • Kettle
  • Conveyor
  • Press
  • Storage System
  • Mixing Units – Blending Units
  • Vacuum Pan
  • Filling and Packaging line


From fresh fruit or from puree?

Jam is most usually produced starting from frozen or aseptically filled fruit puree. However, Bertuzzi can also offer complete plants for producing jam starting directly from almost any type of fresh fruit (apricots, peaches, plums, cherries, strawberries, blueberries, oranges and more). Further information about fruit washing and fruit puree production can be found in the pages dedicated to the specific fruits, see our homepage.

Jam marmalade jelly preserve manufacturing
Receiving of cherries in a jam processing plant
Sorting and washing

Industrial Jam preparation lines

Fruit puree and sugar are dosed on scales or loading cells, they're mixed together and processed by our cooker and vacuum evaporator. This unit is suitable to produce jams, but also sauces and seasonings and it is available in different capacities, from 100 to 2.000 kg/batch.

Jam marmalade jelly preserve manufacturing
Complete Jam production plant
Jam marmalade jelly preserve manufacturing
Vacuum pan

Small and compact Jam preparation lines

For small production of Jam, Bertuzzi developed the Pomona 50, a compact multifunctional unit that collect in one unit the three phases of the jam and sauces production:

Jam marmalade jelly preserve manufacturing
The Multifunctional Bench Pomona 50: the best solution for a complete and automatic jam and confiture production.
Jam marmalade jelly preserve manufacturing
The Pomona 50 during FAT in Bertuzzi Facility

Filling and pasteurizing

In case of the request for a turnkey jam production line, we can easily integrate the suitable jam filling line e.g. into glass jars. Depending on the capacity, customized solutions will be found to meet exactly the requirements.

Jam marmalade jelly preserve manufacturing
A fully automated filling line, consisting of a filler, a capper and a labeler. It has a capacity of approximately 1000 jars per hour
Jam marmalade jelly preserve manufacturing
An essential semi-automated filling line, consisting of a filling machine (right) and a capping machine (left). It allows to process around 100 jars per hour
Jam marmalade jelly preserve manufacturing
Batch pasteurizer
Jam marmalade jelly preserve manufacturing
Jam marmalade jelly preserve manufacturing


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Jam marmalade jelly preserve production process

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