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Pre cooked lunch meat manufacturing app
Pre cooked lunch meat manufacturing app for food manufacturers of meatballs, luncheon, baloney, frankfurter, hot dog, taco meat, sausage manufacturing: manages pre-cooked meat inventory, pre-cooked meat quality control, orders & production, sales & shipping for reduced pre-cooked meat weight.

Pre cooked lunch meat manufacturing app

Pre cooked lunch meat manufacturing app:

For food manufacturers of meatballs, luncheon, baloney, frankfurter, hot dog, taco meat manufacturing:  manages pre-cooked meat inventory, pre-cooked meat quality control, orders & production, sales & shipping for reduced pre-cooked meat weight.

[Meat Packing (Australian) edition of farmsoft - download brochure here]

Processed Meats: Convenience, Nutrition, Taste

Pre cooked lunch meat manufacturing app
Pre cooked lunch meat manufacturing app

Processed meat and poultry products like bacon, hot dogs, sausage, ham and other deli meats are great American traditions and iconic foods. In fact, bacon is often called the ultimate “conversion food” because it tempts even the strictest vegetarian. Processed meat and poultry products are commonly called “convenience meats” because they have already been prepared for easy and safe consumption by consumers. These products are offered in a variety of choices so the consumer can make the best food decision for their lifestyle.

Ninety six percent of Americans make meat and poultry products part of their diets. But recently, questions have arisen about processed meat and poultry products. What are they? How are they different from fresh meat and poultry products? Are they safe and nutritious? This consumer guide aims to provide the facts about processed meat and poultry products. It also offers a guide to the many choices available in the meat and poultry case today. In this way, armed with information, you can make the best choice for you and your family.

Processed Meat’s Ancient History

Historically, salting and smoking preserved meats and kept them safe to eat for longer periods of time.

Meat processing has its roots in the salting and smoking of meats that began centuries ago before refrigeration was available. Salting and smoking preserved meats and kept them safe to eat for longer periods of time. Many of these products are culturally important in other parts of the world like Europe and as people have immigrated to the U.S. in the last two centuries those traditions have developed into the U.S. culture.

While refrigeration is widely available today, over time, many people have come to appreciate the taste, variety and convenience that processed meats can offer.

The common thread is this: processed meats are fresh products that have been changed from their original state. Some have added ingredients like spices. Some are cooked and some are cured.

So What Exactly IS a Processed Meat?

Processing can take many forms. Processed meat and poultry products are a very broad category of many different types of products all defined by having undergone at least one further processing or preparation step such as grinding, adding an ingredient or cooking, which changes the appearance, texture or taste.

Some processed meat and poultry are ready-to-cook, like fresh breakfast sausages that contain meat ground with spices or other flavorful ingredients, or a turkey breast that is marinated and ready-to-cook.

The ready-to-cook category also includes uncooked smoked sausages that are mildly cured through the addition of sodium nitrite, an ingredient that imparts a characteristic pink color and distinct taste. Uncooked, smoked sausages require cooking before eating. Examples include kielbasa, mettwurst and Italian pork sausage.

Other processed meat and poultry are ready-to-eat. Some are smoked sausages that are cured and cooked. They include frankfurters, ham, knockwurst, bologna, mortadella and other luncheon meats. Other processed products such as sliced roast beef and turkey are not cured, but cooked with other ingredients to enhance flavor and more recently to improve food safety.

Linked, cooked smoked sausage like hot dogs and knockwursts are typically consumed steaming hot. Lunch meats or deli meats include products such as pimento loaf, olive loaf, sliced turkey, corned beef and cooked roast beef that are typically consumed without further preparation. Some traditional lunch meats are jellied, like souse and head cheese.

Other ready-to-eat processed products are cured and fermented using seasonings, sodium nitrite and lactic acid, which provides a tangy taste. These products include salami, pepperoni, summer sausage, thuringer and cervelat. Some are called dry and some are called semi-dry depending upon the moisture level in the final product.

The list goes on, but the common thread is this: processed meats are fresh products that have been changed from their original state. Some have added ingredients like spices. Some are cooked and some are cured. Some are ready-to-cook and some are ready-to eat.

Processed Meats Offer Good Nutrition

Processed meats are commonly made from beef, pork, chicken and turkey and each of these offer high quality protein, vitamins and minerals. They can fit into the U.S. Dietary Guidelines eating plans.

Meat and poultry are uniquely rich in protein and absorbable essential vitamins and minerals including iron, zinc, and vitamin B12. These foods are also rich in selenium, choline, vitamin B6, thiamine, niacin, and riboflavin.

Protein from animal sources, such as eggs, milk, beef, pork, poultry, or fish, is of the highest quality becuse it provides all of the essential amino acids. Vegetarian diets must contain a wide variety of plant protein sources in order to provide the complete array of amino acids needed for health that are naturally present in meat and poultry.

When it comes to iron and zinc, the type found in meat and poultry is more “bioavailable,” meaning they are more easily absorbed and utilized by the body, than these same nutrients from grains or vegetables.

Processed meat and poultry products – and all meat and poultry products – also are nutrient dense foods, meaning they provide a high amount of nutrition benefit per calorie.

While meat and poultry processing often uses salt for flavoring and to enhance food safety, meat and poultry processors have been actively engaged in efforts to reduce sodium and offer a wide array of choices with different sodium content, including reduced sodium, in which a product features 75 percent reduction from the original formulation, and low sodium, which contains 140 milligrams or less per serving.

Similarly, for those watching their fat intake, meat and poultry processors offer options that contain less fat.

  • Low fat choices contain three grams or less per serving.
  • Reduced fat choices contain at least 25 percent less fat than a serving of a regular product.
  • Fat free is defined as less than 0.5 grams of fat per labeled serving size.
  • Meat and poultry processors are committed to offering convenient, delicious and nutritious processed meat products in nutrition formulations that suit all nutrition needs and personal preferences.

Do We Eat Too Much Meat, and Particularly Processed Meat?

The Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010 recommend that Americans consume between five and seven ounces from the meat and beans group (now called the protein group) per day. Federal data show that women consume, on average, 4.4 ounces per day from the protein group while men consume 6.9 ounces depending upon age, gender and level of activity 1. Just a small fraction of total meat and poultry consumption is processed meat and poultry.

While there will always be people who over-consume or under-consume, the data suggest that on average, consumers are consuming meat and poultry at recommended levels.

Ingredients in a Popular Brand of Prepared Meatloaf Commonly Found at Retail:

  • Eggs
  • Ketchup
  • Bread crumbs
  • Corn syrup
  • Water
  • Partially hydrogenated soy bean oil
  • Non-fat milk
  • Soup mix
  • Beef

Beef, eggs, ketchup (water, tomato paste, shigh fructose corn syrup, vinegar, salt, dehydrated onion, spices, dextrose), bread crumbs [enriched flour (wheat flour, niacin, reduced iron, thiamine mononitrate, riboflavin, folic acid), corn syrup, water, partially hydrogenated soybean oil, nonfat milk, salt, yeast], soup mix (dehydrated onions, salt, corn starch, onion powder, sugar, caramel color, corn syrup solids, yeast extract, natural flavorings, partially hydrogenated soybean oil, citric acid), water.

Ingredients in a Popular Meatloaf Recipe from Southernfood.com

  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 1/3 cup ketchup
  • 3/4 cup water
  • 1 packet dry onion soup mix
  • 1 1/2 cups bread crumbs
  • 2 pounds lean ground beef

What’s the difference?

The USDA-inspected product that meets USDA label requirements must detail all the ingredients in the product. Each component in ketchup, onion soup and bread crumbs is detailed on the pre-made meatloaf, making it look more complex than the homemade one, when they are actually strikingly similar.

Pre cooked lunch meat manufacturing app
Pre cooked lunch meat manufacturing app

Home Cooking = Meat Processing

All meat and poultry needs to be processed in some way before it is consumed. At home, a food preparer may marinate a chicken breast in lemon juice or teriyaki sauce and then grill it. She or he might make meatloaf by combining raw ground beef with spices like salt, pepper, ketchup and onion powder and then egg and bread crumbs to “bind” the meat together into a loaf and then bake it at 350 degrees F° for an hour. This is very similar to the process used in meat processing plants, where it’s done on a much larger scale.

Consumers sometimes wonder why an ingredient label on a processed product appears to contain more ingredients than a recipe used at home. That’s because a recipe may say “1 cup bread crumbs.” At home, the consumer typically reaches for a container of bread crumbs and thinks nothing more. At a processing plant, the food must be labeled as containing bread crumbs, but then must also declare any ingredients used to make those bread crumbs, like salt, parsley, preservatives and more. (See Box Above). The finished product is the same, but the commercially prepared label looks more complex.

Inspection and Labeling

Meat and poultry products are inspected by U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) every day. Inspectors monitor plant sanitation, proper processing and cooking, when applicable.

As part of their duties, inspectors also check to be sure that labels accurately reflect product ingredients. Any ingredient used in a processed meat or poultry product must be declared on the product label.

Safety and Preparation

The CDC recommends that pregnant women, the elderly, and other immune compromised people reheat lunch meats until steaming hot before consuming them.

Processed meat and poultry products have an excellent safety record. Some processed meats, like a marinated chicken breast, require additional cooking. Consumers should follow instructions on packages carefully and use an instant read thermometer to ensure that the product has reached the proper internal temperature.

Ready-to-eat meat and poultry products, like hot dogs, cooked ham, deli meats and salami, are pre-cooked. When processed in plants, scrupulous sanitation is used to ensure that they are safe and free of bacteria when packaged. However, on very rare occasions, a product may not be 100% free of bacteria like Listeria monocytogenes, which can pose a risk to certain higher risk populations. Pregnant women, the elderly and other immune-compromised people should follow the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommendations2 to reheat lunch meats and other ready-to-eat meats to steaming hot before consuming them.3

Why Is Sodium Nitrite Used?

A panel of experts reviewed NTP’s findings and concluded that nitrite was safe at the levels used and did not belong on the national list of carcinogens.

Sodium nitrite is a compound that is used to “cure” meats. Cured meats have a characteristic color, unique taste and a longer shelf life. Centuries ago, nitrate was used in the form of saltpeter to cure meats before refrigeration was available. This was especially important in preventing the growth of the bacteria Clostridium botulinum, which causes the very deadly disease botulism.

In the 20th century, meat processors shifted to the closely related sodium nitrite because it was more reliable in its effects. Since sodium nitrite has been commonly used in commercially prepared meats, no cases of botulism have been linked to these products in the U.S.

Cured meats contribute very little nitrite to the total diet – less than five percent. The major source of human nitrite exposure is vegetables, especially root vegetables like beets and leafy greens. These foods contain nitrate and when nitrate reacts with your saliva in the mouth, it becomes nitrite.

In the 1970s, a single study that was later discounted cast a dark cloud over nitrite, alleging that its use in cured meats could cause cancer. In response, the U.S. National Toxicology Program (NTP) began a multi-year rat and mouse feeding study to determine if nitrite posed a health risk. In May 2000, a panel of experts reviewed NTP’s findings and concluded that nitrite was safe at the levels used and did not belong on the national list of carcinogens.

‘Alternatively Cured’ Meat Products

Despite nitrite’s safety, meat and poultry processors recognize that some consumers prefer meats that are cured using natural nitrate and nitrite sources like celery powder. These products are increasingly available in your grocery stores.

While meat processors believe these products should be called “cured” because they are cured by the presence of ingredients like celery powder, USDA regulates the label and requires that the products say “Uncured.” In a smaller font, the package declares “No nitrates or nitrites added except for that which naturally occurs in celery powder.” This labeling approach is required by USDA.

Watch the how hot dogs are made video.

WATCH VIDEO

What’s Really in a Hot Dog?
What You See on the Label Is What You Will Find in the Product

Urban legends have led some consumers to wonder – what’s really in a hot dog? While there is much mystery and mystique surrounding hot dog making, the actual process is fairly simple. Small pieces of meat called trimmings, which result when large carcasses are cut into steaks and roasts, are ground in a large chopping bowl and blended with ice, salt, seasonings like garlic and paprika and sodium nitrite. The ingredients form a batter that is inserted into long strands of cellulose casings that are pinched at regular intervals. They are cooked thoroughly, showered in cool water and the casings are removed. The products are then packaged.

Some consumers think that variety meats like hearts or livers are included, but this is rarely the case. While variety meats are safe and wholesome, they are not commonly consumed by Americans and so they are not commonly added to hot dogs. If they are, the product must be called ‘Hot Dogs With Variety Meats” or “Hot Dogs With Meat Byproducts.” The ingredient statement must declare which variety meat was used. A look at the popular brands of hot dogs in the marketplace today will show that it is very unusual to find hot dogs with variety meats in the retail meat case.

Bottom line: what you see on the label is what you will find in the product.

Meat and poultry processors pride themselves in providing a range of products from classic products, reduced fat, reduced sodium to beef, pork and poultry options with different flavors.

Nutrition Benefits and Options

Research continues to document the benefits of protein in the diet, particularly in controlling hunger and in managing weight. 4 Processed meat and poultry products are convenient sources of protein that are packed with key vitamins and minerals including iron, B-vitamins, thiamin and zinc. In fact, meat and poultry products are among the most nutrient dense foods – meaning they offer high nutrition benefits per calorie. Meat and poultry processors understand that people have different health and wellness goals and needs and pride themselves in providing a range of products from classic products, reduced fat, reduced sodium to beef, pork and poultry options with different flavors. Today’s meat and poultry case offers choices for everyone.

Final Thoughts: Balanced Diet

The meat and poultry industry offers many processed meat and poultry choices that are convenient, tasty and nutritious and that meet a range of taste preferences and nutrition needs. Consumers should feel confident in including processed meat and poultry products – from a convenient, marinated pork loin, to a deli turkey sandwich to a juicy bratwurst – as part of their healthy, balanced diets.

Pre cooked lunch meat manufacturing app
Pre cooked lunch meat manufacturing app

Wholesale Cooked Meat Products

Karn Meats is a regionally renowned provider of various cooked meats for further processors, distributors, restaurants and other types of manufacturers. With an emphasis on quality, our team uses only the freshest meat cuts, while going above and beyond to meet USDA food safety guidelines. We are able to mass produce an already established recipe or help devise a completely original formula to call your own. Either way, we provide a handful of samples before production to ensure that we reach the target flavor, mouth feel, texture, fat content, spicing and other taste palette factors.

Shredded Beef

When it comes to the cooked products by Karn Meats, shredded beef is our most commonly ordered protein. Slow cooked and spiced to perfection, our team is able to lock in an ample amount of freshness before freezing, packaging and sending to your facility for further use.

Shredded Chicken, Pork & Turkey

As food safety and meat handling regulations become more strict, many companies turn to outsourced wholesale meat providers to minimize risk of disease or code violation. Karn Meats boasts that, throughout our almost 100 years in the business, we have never come in contact with a food-borne disease at our facility. Poultry is a particularly strict product to handle. So, if you’re looking to minimize the hassle and maximize flavor, contact Karn today.

Taco Meat

With a wide array of uses, the Karn Meat wholesale taco meat product is another one of our most popular services. We strive to replicate your recipe on a large scale and deliver a reliable meat product each and every time – whether your team is using this as filling in tacos, burritos, quesadillas or concessionary entrees, like walking tacos.

Meatloaf

Karn Meats prides itself in delivering fully cooked wholesale meatloaf to customers in the Midwest region. We begin when your company provides us with an original recipe or we can create a new formula together. After this has been agreed upon, expect to receive the exact same high quality product each and every time it is delivered. From home style, to Italian and every variation in between, we specialize in consistently providing the product your customers have grown to love.

  1. The acceptance of gamma irradiated pre-cooked processed chicken meat products
  2. International Nuclear Information System (INIS)
  3. Seri Chempaka Mohd Yusof; Muhamad Lebai Juri; Foziah Ali; Salahbiah Abdul Majida; Mariani Deraman; Ros Anita Ahmad Ramli; Rohaizah Ahmad; Zainab Harun; Abdul Salam Babji
  4. 2009-01-01
  5. A study was carried out to determine suitable dose, microbiological counts including pathogens and sensory evaluation of pre-cooked chicken meat products in assessing the acceptability of irradiated pre-cooked chicken meat products. Packed pre-cooked chicken sausages and burger samples (sealed individually in plastic-polyethylene pouches) were irradiated at the following doses: 2.5 kGy, 3.5 kGy and 5.5 kGy using 60 Co gamma irradiation at MINTec-Sinagama. Acceptability of the sausages was determined through sensory evaluation by 30 members of untrained panelists comprising staff of Malaysian Nuclear Agency. A 5-points hedonic rating scale was used. The attributes evaluated were taste, texture, chewiness, juiciness, aroma, colour, shape and overall acceptance. Samples irradiated with dose of 5.5 kGy were the most acceptable, followed by samples irradiated at 3.5 kGy and 10 kGy. Irradiation at doses up to 3.5 kGy render undetectable microorganisms/fungi and pathogens (faecal coliforms, Salmonella sp., Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus) in pre-cooked chicken sausages, and doses up to 5.5 kGy for pre-cooked chicken burgers
  6. Effects of frozen storage on survival of Staphylococcus aureus and enterotoxin production in precooked tuna meat.
  7. Science.gov (United States)
  8. Wu, Xulei; Su, Yi-Cheng
  9. 2014-08-01
  10. This study investigated the survival of Staphylococcus aureus in precooked tuna meat for producing canned products during frozen storage (-20 ± 2 °C) as well as its growth and enterotoxin production at 35 to 37 °C after the storage. Samples (50 ± 5 g) of precooked albacore (loin, chunk, and flake) and skipjack (chunk and flake) tuna were inoculated with 5 enterotoxin-producing strains of S. aureus at a level of approximately 3.5 log CFU/g and individually packed in a vacuum bag after 3 h incubation at 35 to 37 °C. Vacuum-packed samples were stored in a freezer (-20 ± 2 °C) for 4 wk. The frozen samples were then thawed in 37 °C circulating water for 2 h and incubated at 35 to 37 °C for 22 h. Populations of S. aureus in all precooked tuna samples decreased slightly (canned tuna within 6 to 8 h of thawing to avoid product spoilage and potential enterotoxin production by S. aureus in contaminated precooked tuna meat. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®
  11. Advancements in meat packaging.
  12. Science.gov (United States)
  13. McMillin, Kenneth W
  14. 2017-10-01
  15. Packaging of meat provides the same or similar benefits for raw chilled and processed meats as other types of food packaging. Although air-permeable packaging is most prevalent for raw chilled red meat, vacuum and modified atmosphere packaging offer longer shelf life. The major advancements in meat packaging have been in the widely used plastic polymers while biobased materials and their integration into composite packaging are receiving much attention for functionality and sustainability. At this time, active and intelligent packaging are not widely used for antioxidant, antimicrobial, and other functions to stabilize and enhance meat properties although many options are being developed and investigated. The advances being made in nanotechnology will be incorporated into food packaging and presumably into meat packaging when appropriate and useful. Intelligent packaging using sensors for transmission of desired information and prompting of subsequent changes in packaging materials, environments or the products to maintain safety and quality are still in developmental stages. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  16. Shelf life of fresh air packaged and precooked vacuum packaged quails
  17. Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)
  18. Francesca Piras
  19. 2013-11-01
  20. Full Text Available The shelf-life of 3 batches (Q1, Q2, Q3 of quail meat, were examined. Q1 were cut and seasoned with commercial olive oil, stoned green olive and sliced bacon. Q2 were divided into two subgroups: Q2.1 produced in the previously described conditions; Q2.2 seasoned also with rosemary. Quails were placed in lowdensity polystirene barrier trays and aerobically packaged. Q3 quails were boiled in salted hot water for 40 min, seasoned with myrtle leafs, placed in low density polyethylene bags and vacuum packaged. All samples were stored at +2 and +7°C. Analysis were conducted at 0, 3, 7, 9 and 14 days (T0, T3, T7, T9, and T14, respectively. For all the samples, pH measurement and microbial analysis [total viable count (TVC, Enterobacteriaceae, E. coli, Lactobacillus spp. (LAB, Pseudomonas spp., Brochothrix thermosphacta, coagulase-negative Staphylococci (CNS, Enterococcus spp., yeasts and moulds, Salmonella spp., Listeria monocytogenes] were performed. Initial TVC levels of fresh quails (ca. 4 log CFU/g were rather high and this may be due to the microbial population of the raw material. In Q1 and Q2.1 samples, TVC reached the value of 7 log, which is considered as the upper acceptability limit for fresh poultry meat (after T9 under storage at +2°C and after T7 at +7°C. In Q2.2 samples such limit was reached earlier, after T3. In Q3 samples, lower TVC levels were recorded and did not reach the above mentioned limit, not even at the end of storage. However, mean counts >5 log were reached, maybe because of a post-cooking cross-contamination. Salmonella spp. prevalence was 33% in Q1, Q2.1 and Q2.2 samples.
  21. Isolation of Yersinia from raw meat (pork and chicken) and precooked meat (porcine tongues and sausages) collected from commercial establishments in Mexico City.
  22. Science.gov (United States)
  23. Ramírez, E I; Vázquez-Salinas, C; Rodas-Suárez, O R; Pedroche, F F
  24. 2000-04-01
  25. A total of 160 meat product samples were collected from commercial outlets in Mexico City to investigate the presence of different species of Yersinia by the 4 degrees C enrichment method after 1, 3, 5, and 7 days of incubation using alkaline treatment and isolating in cefsulodin-Irgasan-novobiocin and MacConkey agars with Tween 80. Overall, Yersinia spp. were isolated from 27% of the samples analyzed, whereas 40% of the raw and only 13% of the precooked samples were contaminated. Although 2,970 colonies showed Yersinia characteristics, only 706 (24%) actually corresponded to this genus: 49% were Yersinia enterocolitica, 25% Yersinia kristensenii, 15% Yersinia intermedia, 9% Yersinia frederiksenii, and 2% Yersinia aldovae; 10% corresponded to biotype 2, 2% to biotype 3, and 4% to biotype 4. The presence of Yersinia in raw and cooked meat products represents a health risk for consumers in Mexico, where further clinical studies are needed to assess the epidemiological importance of this pathogen.
  26. ACTIVE PACKAGING SYSTEM FOR MEAT AND MEAT PRODUCTS
  27. Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)
  28. Adriana Pavelková
  29. 2012-10-01
  30. Full Text Available In the recent past, food packaging was used to enable marketing of products and to provide passive protection against environmental contaminations or influences that affect the shelf life of the products. However, unlike traditional packaging, which must be totally inert, active packaging is designed to interact with the contents and/or the surrounding environment. Interest in the use of active packaging systems for meat and meat products has increased in recent years. Active packaging systems are developed with the goal of extending shelf life for foods and increasing the period of time that the food is high quality. Developments in active packaging have led to advances in many areas, including delayed oxidation and controlled respiration rate, microbial growth, and moisture migration. Active packaging technologies include some physical, chemical, or biological action which changes interactions between a package, product, and/or headspace of the package in order to get a desired outcome. Active packaging systems discussed include oxygen scavengers, carbon dioxide scavengers and emitters, moisture control agents, flavour/odour absorbers and releasers  and antimicrobial packaging technologies. Active packaging is typically found in two types of systems; sachets and pads which are placed inside of packages, and active ingredients that are incorporated directly into packaging materials.  Recognition of the benefits of active packaging technologies by the food industry, development of economically viable packaging systems and increased consumer acceptance is necessary for commercial realisation of these packaging technologies.doi:10.5219/205
  31. Biobased Packaging - Application in Meat Industry
  32. Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)
  33. S. Wilfred Ruban
  34. 2009-04-01
  35. Full Text Available Because of growing problems of waste disposal and because petroleum is a nonrenewable resource with diminishing quantities, renewed interest in packaging research is underway to develop and promote the use of “bio-plastics.” In general, compared to conventional plastics derived from petroleum, bio-based polymers have more diverse stereochemistry and architecture of side chains which enable research scientists a greater number of opportunities to customize the properties of the final packaging material. The primary challenge facing the food (Meat industry in producing bio-plastic packaging, currently, is to match the durability of the packaging with product shelf-life. Notable advances in biopolymer production, consumer demand for more environmentally-friendly packaging, and technologies that allow packaging to do more than just encompass the food are driving new and novel research and developments in the area of packaging for muscle foods. [Vet. World 2009; 2(2.000: 79-82
  36. Ammonia gas permeability of meat packaging materials.
  37. Science.gov (United States)
  38. Karim, Faris; Hijaz, Faraj; Kastner, Curtis L; Smith, J Scott
  39. 2011-03-01
  40. Meat products are packaged in polymer films designed to protect the product from exterior contaminants such as light, humidity, and harmful chemicals. Unfortunately, there is almost no data on ammonia permeability of packaging films. We investigated ammonia permeability of common meat packaging films: low-density polyethylene (LDPE; 2.2 mil), multilayer polyolefin (MLP; 3 mil), and vacuum (V-PA/PE; 3 mil, 0.6 mil polyamide/2.4 mil polyethylene). The films were fabricated into 10 × 5 cm pouches and filled with 50 mL deionized water. Pouches were placed in a plexiglass enclosure in a freezer and exposed to 50, 100, 250, or 500 ppm ammonia gas for 6, 12, 24, and 48 h at -17 ± 3 °C and 21 ± 3 °C. At freezing temperatures, no ammonia residues were detected and no differences in pH were found in the water. At room temperature, ammonia levels and pH of the water increased significantly (P packaging materials have low ammonia permeability and protect meat products exposed to ammonia leaks during frozen storage.
  41. Irradiated multilayer film for primal meat packaging
  42. International Nuclear Information System (INIS)
  43. Lustig, S.; Schuetz, J.M.; Vicik, S.J.
  44. 1987-01-01
  45. This patent deals with a heat-shrinkable, multilayer film suitable for use in fabricating bags for packaging primal and sub-primal meat cuts and processed meats. The multilayer film has a first outer layer of a first ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer, a core layer of a polyvinylidene chloride-vinyl chloride copolymer containing between about 70 weight percent and about 90 weight percent vinylidene chloride as a barrier film, and a second outer layer of a second ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer. The multilayer film is preferably made by co-extrusion of the layers, and then it is biaxially stretched. After biaxial stretching, the entire multilayer film is substantially uniformly irradiated to a dosage level of between about 2 megarads and about 3 megarads and heat-sealed in the form of a bag. The film is not significantly discoloured by the irradiation and the bag has improved toughness properties and heat-sealing characteristics
  46. Irradiated multilayer film for primal meat packaging
  47. International Nuclear Information System (INIS)
  48. Lustig, S.; Schuetz, J.M.; Vicik, S.J.
  49. 1987-01-01
  50. This patent deals with a heat-shrinkable, multilayer film suitable for use in fabricating bags for packaging primal and sub-primal meat cuts and processed meats. The multilayer film has a first outer layer of an ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer, a core layer of a barrier film comprising vinylidene chloride-methyl acrylate copolymer, and a second outer layer of an ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer. The multilayer film is preferably made by co-extrusion of the layers, and then it is biaxially stretched. After biaxial stretching, the multilayer film is irradiated to a dosage level of between 1 megarad and 5 megarads and heat-sealed in the form of a bag. The bag has improved storage stability characteristics
  51. Nanotechnology in meat processing and packaging: potential applications - a review.
  52. Science.gov (United States)
  53. Ramachandraiah, Karna; Han, Sung Gu; Chin, Koo Bok
  54. 2015-02-01
  55. Growing demand for sustainable production, increasing competition and consideration of health concerns have led the meat industries on a path to innovation. Meat industries across the world are focusing on the development of novel meat products and processes to meet consumer demand. Hence, a process innovation, like nanotechnology, can have a significant impact on the meat processing industry through the development of not only novel functional meat products, but also novel packaging for the products. The potential benefits of utilizing nanomaterials in food are improved bioavailability, antimicrobial effects, enhanced sensory acceptance and targeted delivery of bioactive compounds. However, challenges exist in the application of nanomaterials due to knowledge gaps in the production of ingredients such as nanopowders, stability of delivery systems in meat products and health risks caused by the same properties which also offer the benefits. For the success of nanotechnology in meat products, challenges in public acceptance, economics and the regulation of food processed with nanomaterials which may have the potential to persist, accumulate and lead to toxicity need to be addressed. So far, the most promising area for nanotechnology application seems to be in meat packaging, but the long term effects on human health and environment due to migration of the nanomaterials from the packaging needs to be studied further. The future of nanotechnology in meat products depends on the roles played by governments, regulatory agencies and manufacturers in addressing the challenges related to the application of nanomaterials in food.
  56. Smart Packaging Technologies and Their Application in Conventional Meat Packaging Systems
  57. Science.gov (United States)
  58. O'Grady, Michael N.; Kerry, Joseph P.
  59. Preservative packaging of meat and meat products should maintain acceptable appearance, odour and flavour and should delay the onset of microbial spoilage. Typically fresh red meats are placed on trays and over-wrapped with an oxygen permeable film or alternatively, meats are stored in modified atmosphere packages (MAP) containing high levels of oxygen and carbon dioxide (80% O2:20% CO2) (Georgala & Davidson, 1970). Cooked meats are usually stored in 70% N2:30% CO2 (Smiddy, Papkovsky, & Kerry, 2002). The function of oxygen in MAP is to maintain acceptable fresh meat colour and carbon dioxide inhibits the growth of spoilage bacteria (Seideman & Durland, 1984). Nitrogen is used as an inert filler gas either to reduce the proportions of the other gases or to maintain the pack shape (Bell & Bourke, 1996).
  60. Electrospun antimicrobial hybrid mats: Innovative packaging material for meat and meat-products.
  61. Science.gov (United States)
  62. Amna, Touseef; Yang, Jieun; Ryu, Kyeong-Seon; Hwang, I H
  63. 2015-07-01
  64. To prevent the development and spread of spoilage/pathogenic microorganisms via meat foodstuffs, antimicrobial nanocomposite packaging can serve as a potential alternative. The objective of this study was to develop a new class of antimicrobial hybrid packaging mat composed of biodegradable polyurethane supplemented with virgin olive oil and zinc oxide via electrospinning. Instead of mixing antimicrobial compounds directly with food, incorporation in packaging materials allows the functional effect at food surfaces where microbial activity is localized. The nanofibers were characterized by SEM, EDX, XRD and TEM. The antibacterial activity was tested against two common foodborne pathogens viz., Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella typhimurium. The present results indicated that incorporation of olive oil in the polymer affected morphology of PU nanofibers and nanocomposite packaging were able to inhibit growth of pathogens. Thus; as-spun mat can be used as prospective antimicrobial packaging, which potentially reduces contamination of meat/meat-products. Moreover, introduced biodegradable packaging for meat products could serve to replace PVC films and simultaneously help to protect natural environment.
  65. Characteristics of meat packaging materials and their environmental suitability assessment
  66. Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)
  67. Å uput Danijela Z.
  68. 2013-01-01
  69. Full Text Available After functional phase, packaging becomes waste that is recycled or disposed of in landfills. Recently, numerus packages have been developed for assessing the packaging risk on the environment. We applied Gabi 4 Education software on polymer product packaging for meat products. The objective of first part of the paper was characterization of materials used for meat and meat products packaging in terms of mechanical and barrier properties. Results show that tested materials are able to keep protective atmosphere and contribute to the quality and sustainability of the product. Air permeability was 3.60 and 26.60 ml/m224h, and water vapor was 6.90 and 9.50 ml/m224h, respectively, for foils 1 and 2, as a result of different film composition. In second part, based on real data, Gabi 4 Education software is applied. The obtained results showed that organic compounds emissions have the highest impact on human health and the most damaging environmental impact observed was the emission of CO2.
  70. Use of Optical Oxygen Sensors in Non-Destructively Determining the Levels of Oxygen Present in Combined Vacuum and Modified Atmosphere Packaged Pre-Cooked Convenience-Style Foods and the Use of Ethanol Emitters to Extend Product Shelf-Life
  71. Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)
  72. Andreas W. Hempel
  73. 2013-11-01
  74. Full Text Available O2 sensors were used to non-destructively monitor O2 levels in commercially packed pre-cooked, convenience modified atmosphere packaging (MAP foods. A substantial level of O2 (>15% was present in packs resulting in a shorter than expected shelf-life, where the primary spoilage mechanism was found to be mould. Various combinations of vacuum (0–0.6 MPa and gas flush (0.02–0.03 MPa (30% CO2/70% N2 settings were assessed as treatments that result in the desired shelf-life (28 days. This was achieved using the combined treatment of vacuum 0.35 MPa and gas flush 0.02 MPa which resulted in a reduction of 6%–9% O2 in all three samples (battered sausages (BS, bacon slices (BA, and meat and potato pies (PP. Reduced O2 levels reflect the microbial quality of products, which has been successfully reduced. Duplicate samples of all product packs were produced using ethanol emitters (EE to see if shelf-life could be further extended. Results showed a further improvement in shelf-life to 35 days. Sensory analysis showed that ethanol flavour and aroma was not perceived by panellists in two of the three products assessed. This study demonstrates how smart packaging technologies, both intelligent and active, can be used to assist in the modification of conventional packaging systems in order to enhance product quality and safety and through the extension of product shelf-life.
  75. Bacterial communities of fresh goat meat packaged in modified atmosphere.
  76. Science.gov (United States)
  77. Carrizosa, Elia; Benito, María José; Ruiz-Moyano, Santiago; Hernández, Alejandro; Villalobos, Maria Del Carmen; Martín, Alberto; Córdoba, María de Guía
  78. 2017-08-01
  79. The objective of this work was to study the growth and development of fortuitous flora and food pathogens in fresh goat meat packaged under modified atmospheres containing two different concentrations of CO 2 . Meat samples were stored at 10 °C under two different modified-atmosphere packing (MAP) conditions: treatment A had 45% CO 2  + 20% O 2  + 35% N 2 and treatment B had 20% CO 2  + 55% O 2  + 25% N 2 . During 14 days of storage, counts of each bacterial group and dominant species identification by 16S rRNA gene sequencing were performed to determine the microbial diversity present. The MAP condition used for treatment A was a more effective gas mixture for increasing the shelf life of fresh goat meat, significantly reducing the total number of viable bacteria and enterobacteria counts. Members of the Enterobacteriaceae family were the most common contaminants, although Hafnia alvei was dominant in treatment A and Serratia proteamaculans in treatment B. Identification studies at the species level showed that different microorganisms develop under different storage conditions, reflecting the importance of gas composition in the modified atmosphere on the bacterial community. This work provides new insights into the microbial changes of goat meat storage under different MAP conditions, which will be beneficial for the meat industry. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  80. Carbon Monoxide in Meat and Fish Packaging: Advantages and Limits
  81. Science.gov (United States)
  82. Roncalés, Pedro
  83. 2018-01-01
  84. Due to increased demands for greater expectation in relation to quality, convenience, safety and extended shelf-life, combined with growing demand from retailers for cost-effective extensions of fresh muscle foods’ shelf-life, the food packaging industry quickly developed to meet these expectations. During the last few decades, modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) of foods has been a promising area of research, but much remains to be known regarding the use of unconventional gases such carbon monoxide (CO). The use of CO for meat and seafood packaging is not allowed in most countries due to the potential toxic effect, and its use is controversial in some countries. The commercial application of CO in food packaging was not then considered feasible because of possible environmental hazards for workers. CO has previously been reported to mask muscle foods’ spoilage, and this was the primary concern raised for the prohibition, as this may mislead consumers. This review was undertaken to present the most comprehensive and current overview of the widely-available, scattered information about the use of CO in the preservation of muscle foods. The advantages of CO and its industrial limits are presented and discussed. The most recent literature on the consumer safety issues related to the use of CO and consumer acceptance of CO especially in meat packaging systems were also discussed. Recommendations and future prospects were addressed for food industries, consumers and regulators on what would be a “best practice” in the use of CO in food packaging. All this promotes high ethical standards in commercial communications by means of effective regulation, for the benefit of consumers and businesses in the world, and this implies that industrialized countries and members of their regulatory agencies must develop a coherent and robust systems of regulation and control that can respond effectively to new challenges. PMID:29360803
  85. Carbon Monoxide in Meat and Fish Packaging: Advantages and Limits
  86. Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)
  87. Djamel Djenane
  88. 2018-01-01
  89. Full Text Available Due to increased demands for greater expectation in relation to quality, convenience, safety and extended shelf-life, combined with growing demand from retailers for cost-effective extensions of fresh muscle foods’ shelf-life, the food packaging industry quickly developed to meet these expectations. During the last few decades, modified atmosphere packaging (MAP of foods has been a promising area of research, but much remains to be known regarding the use of unconventional gases such carbon monoxide (CO. The use of CO for meat and seafood packaging is not allowed in most countries due to the potential toxic effect, and its use is controversial in some countries. The commercial application of CO in food packaging was not then considered feasible because of possible environmental hazards for workers. CO has previously been reported to mask muscle foods’ spoilage, and this was the primary concern raised for the prohibition, as this may mislead consumers. This review was undertaken to present the most comprehensive and current overview of the widely-available, scattered information about the use of CO in the preservation of muscle foods. The advantages of CO and its industrial limits are presented and discussed. The most recent literature on the consumer safety issues related to the use of CO and consumer acceptance of CO especially in meat packaging systems were also discussed. Recommendations and future prospects were addressed for food industries, consumers and regulators on what would be a “best practice” in the use of CO in food packaging. All this promotes high ethical standards in commercial communications by means of effective regulation, for the benefit of consumers and businesses in the world, and this implies that industrialized countries and members of their regulatory agencies must develop a coherent and robust systems of regulation and control that can respond effectively to new challenges.
  90. Fresh meat packaging: consumer acceptance of modified atmosphere packaging including carbon monoxide.
  91. Science.gov (United States)
  92. Grebitus, Carola; Jensen, Helen H; Roosen, Jutta; Sebranek, Joseph G
  93. 2013-01-01
  94. Consumers' perceptions and evaluations of meat quality attributes such as color and shelf life influence purchasing decisions, and these product attributes can be affected by the type of fresh meat packaging system. Modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) extends the shelf life of fresh meat and, with the inclusion of carbon monoxide (CO-MAP), achieves significant color stabilization. The objective of this study was to assess whether consumers would accept specific packaging technologies and what value consumers place on ground beef packaged under various atmospheres when their choices involved the attributes of color and shelf life. The study used nonhypothetical consumer choice experiments to determine the premiums that consumers are willing to pay for extended shelf life resulting from MAP and for the "cherry red" color in meat resulting from CO-MAP. The experimental design allowed determination of whether consumers would discount foods with MAP or CO-MAP when (i) they are given more detailed information about the technologies and (ii) they have different levels of individual knowledge and media exposure. The empirical analysis was conducted using multinomial logit models. Results indicate that consumers prefer an extension of shelf life as long as the applied technology is known and understood. Consumers had clear preferences for brighter (aerobic and CO) red color and were willing to pay $0.16/lb ($0.35/kg) for each level of change to the preferred color. More information on MAP for extending the shelf life and on CO-MAP for stabilizing color decreased consumers' willingness to pay. An increase in personal knowledge and media exposure influenced acceptance of CO-MAP negatively. The results provide quantitative measures of how packaging affects consumers' acceptance and willingness to pay for products. Such information can benefit food producers and retailers who make decisions about investing in new packaging methods.
  95. Modeling heat transfer and inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in precooked meat products in Argentina using the finite element method.
  96. Science.gov (United States)
  97. Santos, M V; Zaritzky, N; Califano, A
  98. 2008-07-01
  99. The presence of Escherichia coli is linked with sanitary deficiencies and undercooking of meat products. Recent studies have detected E. coli O157:H7 in black blood sausages. Minimum time-temperature specifications to kill the bacteria were obtained by numerical simulations of the microscopic heat conduction equation using the finite element method, and calculating the temperature profile of the sausage and the population of E. coli at the coldest point during heating. The model was validated by heating sausages in a water-bath. The effects of heat transfer coefficients and water temperatures on the required time to achieve an inactivation value (IV) of 12(log) are reported. Macroscopic heat balances were simultaneously solved to consider the temperature drop in the water batch as a function of the ratio between the mass of thermally treated sausage and the heat capacity of the system.

There will never be too many chefs in our kitchen.

The food services industry in Australia is driven by customer demand. Creative Food Solutions (CFS) is the name of the Production Kitchen of Andrew's Meats Australia. A vision of Andrews Meats in the 90's, based on growing demand to supply restaurant quality cooked meat products with no preservatives to food service customers, CFS was founded in 2005.

Today, as an established and respected food services industry brand, CFS's reputation is further enhanced by a state-of-the-art manufacturing facility that's arguably, the most advanced cooked food service operation in the country where countless industry awards are testament to an on-going commitment to quality throughout all stages of manufacture.

Supported by a dedicated and knowledgeable team of chefs and foodies who understand the art of cooking and appreciate the pleasure good food brings, innovation is the inspiration that continually delivers new products. Inspiration is based on current food trends and concepts where an ever-expanding range of premium quality meat products and cuts and cooking processes are utilised to revolutionise the way cooked and pre-cooked meats are presented to the food service industry.

One of the most important features of the CFS range is the slow cooking time that ensures the highest quality product. This has resulted in CFS developing their own sous vide technology and cooking standards to ensure that strict industry standards and customer expectations are continually exceeded.

From Australia's largest supermarket chains to large catering companies, contractors and boutique getaway destinations, Creative Food Solutions is committed to servicing their customers with an ever expanding range of high quality cooked and pre-cooked meals that reliably deliver restaurant quality meat products.

Pre cooked lunch meat manufacturing app
Pre cooked lunch meat manufacturing app

Our Kitchen. Your Inspiration.

Food trends, styles, origins and tastes continually evolve... and so do we when it comes to research and development. Our state-of-the-art facility affords you the opportunity to capitalise not only on our technology, but over 180 years of combined chef experience with our senior menu development team to create unique, signature recipes for your restaurant or catering group.

By committing to a set volume, you can think of our CFS facilities as your production kitchen where a benchmark of product consistency can be achieved to supply product across any number of sites within your organisation from production to the holding and delivering of stock when you need it.

Industry Awards

Pre cooked lunch meat manufacturing app
Pre cooked lunch meat manufacturing app

GOLD

2015 Australian Packaging Design Awards Consumer Experience and Emerging Technology

Pre cooked lunch meat manufacturing app
Pre cooked lunch meat manufacturing app

GOLD MEDAL

2015 Australian Packaging Design Awards Consumer Experience and Emerging Technology

SECTION WINNER:

Food Magazine Awards

2013 Meat and Smallgoods - Grab and Go Roast Meals

Pre cooked lunch meat manufacturing app
Pre cooked lunch meat manufacturing app

SECTION WINNER:

Food Magazine Awards

2012 Ready Meals - Emily's Kitchen Ready Meals

Pre cooked lunch meat manufacturing app
Pre cooked lunch meat manufacturing app

SECTION WINNER:

Food Magazine Awards

2008 Ready Meals - ALDI specially selected restaurant meals.

Pre cooked lunch meat manufacturing app
Pre cooked lunch meat manufacturing app

SECTION WINNER:

Food Magazine Awards

2016 Meat Poultry & Small Goods - American BBQ Range

Pre cooked lunch meat manufacturing app
Pre cooked lunch meat manufacturing app

SECTION WINNER:

Food Magazine Awards

2016 Ready Meal of the year - Healthy Everyday by Pete Evans

Pre cooked lunch meat manufacturing app
Pre cooked lunch meat manufacturing app

SECTION WINNER:

Food Magazine Awards

2017 Ready Meal of the year - CFS Appetite for Healthy

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Pre cooked lunch meat manufacturing app

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