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USDA APHIS Compliance fruit & vegetables
USDA APHIS compliance software solution to improve fruit and vegetable compliance for import and export to the USA. Increase efficiency, reduce waste in the fresh produce supply chain.

USDA APHIS Compliance fruit & vegetables

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[POST HARVEST BROCHURE]   [RFID]   [FARM MANAGEMENT]

USDA APHIS compliance software solutions guide your fresh produce handling processes and ensure strict and easy compliance with traceability, food safety, and recall processes for importers and exporters.

USDA APHIS compliance software solution
USDA APHIS Compliance fruit & vegetables

USDA APHIS compliance software solution for packers of fruit and vegetables: processors, exporters and wholesalers of fresh produce.  

Control the entire fruit packaging, sales and distribution processes.    

USDA APHIS compliance software solutions from farmsoft guides employees through the entire USDA APHIS compliance process, making sure every action is taken at the correct time, and correct traceability details are being preserved at every step.  This results in reduced waste and increased employee productivity by following correct food handling and food safety processes for post harvest activities in USDA APHIS compliance  environments.  Using farmsoft’s document management system for permits and certifications, you can manage Organism & Soil Permits, Plant Product Permits, transit permit information, fruit and vegetable import requirements (FAVIR), permit to import plants and more.

For a USDA APHIS compliance software solution that requires easy management of fruit handling, storage, fruit packaging, processing, and sales – choose the farmsoft USDA APHIS compliance software solution. Using farmsoft USDA APHIS compliance software solution, your fruit packaging facility can implement higher traceability and food safety standards. USDA APHIS compliance software solution from farmsoft concentrate on the reduction of post harvest waste and fresh produce spoilage. Your farmsoft USDA APHIS compliance software solution expert can provide your fruit packaging facility with expert advice and guide your team through the implementation process to ensure your USDA APHIS compliance software solution is up and running in no time at all.  During this process, various farmsoft fruit packaging functionality will be tweaked to ensure the USDA APHIS compliance software solution provides all possible benefits and cost savings for your fruit packaging facility.   The Enterprise edition of farmsoft USDA APHIS compliance software solution includes exclusive functionality not available in other editions of farmsoft  (see comparison between Enterprise and Small Business editions).    

Full support, full training, all features & benefits included.  

USDA APHIS compliance software solution made easy.  Reduce waste and fruit packaging complexity now!   Talk to a solution expert today.

USDA APHIS compliance software solution
USDA APHIS Compliance fruit & vegetables

For fruit packaging facilities that are medium to large in size, farmsoft USDA APHIS compliance software solution.  You can setup your fruit packaging solution in as little as half an hour.  

 

Contact us to get started today –  ask for the Small Business USDA APHIS compliance software solution.

USDA APHIS compliance software solution
USDA APHIS Compliance fruit & vegetables

benefits of your USDA APHIS compliance software solution:

>> Consistent quality control

>> Improve dispatch accuracy

>> Reduce waste

>> Reduce compliance costs

>> Easy and accurate traceability

>> Make administration easy

.

>> Improve production planning  

Your USDA APHIS compliance software solution will make every day fresh produce business management easier and more efficient.  Contact us to talk with an expert today.

USDA APHIS compliance software solutions for fruit & vegetables
USDA APHIS Compliance fruit & vegetables
Post harvest fruit vegetable
USDA APHIS Compliance fruit & vegetables

USDA APHIS compliance software  

Plant Protection and Quarantine (PPQ) regulates the importation of plants and plant products under the authority of the Plant Protection Act. PPQ maintains its import program to safeguard U.S. agriculture and natural resources from the risks associated with the entry, establishment, or spread of animal and plant pests and noxious weeds.

The importance of appropriate post-harvest handling of produce to preserve quality as a differentiating factor and as a market opening tool.

USDA may require a written permit for importing fresh and/or frozen fruits and vegetables (including fresh herbs and sprouts) for consumption from all foreign sources into the United States and its territories.

A summary of basic requirements for imported fruits and vegetables is available on the Internet at the Fruits and Vegetables Import Requirements (FAVIR) Database or in the PDF electronic USDA, APHIS, PPQ, Fruit and Vegetable Manual.

Reference: fruit processing fresh produce traceability packhouse traceability supply chain traceability fresh produce.

APHIS: Final rule to expand notice-based process for import of fruit and veg

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) is expanding its use of a notice-based process for approving fruits and vegetables for importation into the United States. This will help APHIS achieve USDA’s goal of reducing regulations by eliminating the need for rule-making to approve fruits and vegetables for import. This action does not in any way compromise the rigor of APHIS’ analysis for potential plant pest risks, nor our safeguarding efforts. Instead, it will streamline procedures and help to reduce the time it takes to approve commodities for entry into the United States. This change will also allow us to focus regulatory resources, which would otherwise be consumed with the lengthy rule-making process, on other critical priorities.

Previously, APHIS required proposed and final rules to allow a new commodity access to the U.S. market. In 2007, APHIS began using a notice-based process for approving fruits and vegetables for importation on a limited basis. Since then, a number of commodities have been safely introduced into the United States under this procedure. Moving forward, APHIS will use the notice-based process for approving all new fruits and vegetables for importation. That means, APHIS will issue a notice to announce a new fruit or vegetable for importation and publish a pest risk assessment in the Federal Register for public comment. APHIS will carefully consider all comments received and announce a decision to allow a new fruit or vegetable entry into the United States in a subsequent Federal Register notice.


The science-based process for assessing risk and mitigation remains the same. APHIS will continue to prepare economic documentation for all notices. The public is also still able to submit comments on the pest risk assessment, which will be available for review and comment for a minimum of 60 days when it is posted in the Federal Register.


APHIS will make similar revisions to its regulations for the interstate movement of fruits and vegetables from Hawaii and U.S. territories to align them with the new process for the importation of new fruits and vegetables.

When the final rule is implemented, the Fresh Fruits and Vegetables Manual will no longer be available. All content regarding entry requirements for fresh fruits and vegetables as well as additional information containing language currently housed in 7 CFR 319.56 will be in the FAVIR Database only. You can access the FAVIR database here.


The rule becomes effective on October 15, 2018.


For more information:

www.aphis.usda.gov/aphis

APHIS proposing upping fees, for first time in a decade

The United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) is announcing proposed changes to the fees it charges to recoup the costs of conducting agricultural quarantine inspections (AQI) at U.S. ports of entry. The adjustments APHIS proposes, the first changes to AQI user fees in nearly a decade, will ensure that the AQI program will have the financial stability it needs to continue the critical work of keeping U.S. agriculture safe and productive Agriculture, our country’s largest industry and employer, accounts for more than $1 trillion in annual economic activity. As volumes of international trade and travel both increase, so do the risks that foreign animal and plant pests and diseases can enter and establish themselves in the United States.

APHIS Compliance fruit & vegetables
APHIS Compliance fruit & vegetables



AQI activities include inspections conducted by the Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS) U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) of conveyances, cargo and passenger baggage entering the country as well as APHIS’ analytical and scientific work to track pests overseas, focus inspections at ports of entry, and develop the import regulations that protect U.S. animal and plant health from foreign pests. The fees should fully fund the actual costs of running the AQI program and be borne by those using the services. However, revenue from fees charged has been insufficient to cover all costs and compelled DHS to use appropriated funds that should be available for other important homeland security functions and initiatives.

APHIS is concurrently proposing to adjust the hourly rates charged when APHIS employees perform work associated with AQI activities on Sundays, holidays or other after-hours periods so APHIS can recover the true cost of providing the services. The overtime rates would be raised commensurate with the anticipated cost of providing AQI services through 2018. This proposed rule includes clarifying regulations so that AQI inspections performed by DHS can be billed in accordance with DHS overtime regulations. This proposed rule will also be available for a 60 day comment period. This is the first proposed change to overtime rates since 2002.

The proposed AQI fee structure ensures that no one party pays more than the costs of the services they incur. Because the proposal aligns fees with actual program costs, some fees will be lowered under the proposed structure. APHIS is proposing to lower fees for international air passengers from $5 to $4 per passenger and fees for railroad cars from $7.75 to $2 per railroad car. The current fees for these services generate more revenue than needed to cover their costs.

APHIS also proposes to raise user fees for inspections of commercial aircraft from $70.75 to $225, commercial maritime cargo vessels from $496 to $825, commercial trucks with a transponder (a sticker that contains an electronic chip that transmits information about the vehicle’s user fee payment status) from $105 to $320 a year, and commercial trucks without a Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service transponder from $5.25 to $8 per crossing. In each of these cases, current fees do not generate sufficient revenue to cover the costs of the services. APHIS is also proposing to add a $2 fee per sea passenger to recover costs associated with inspecting cruise vessels and passenger baggage, and to add a $375 fee to recover the costs of APHIS services for monitoring the application of or providing treatments to imported car go to minimize pest risks.

APHIS worked with an independent accounting firm to review the AQI fee structure and carefully considered a number of alternatives for revising the user fees. Much of the additional revenue from fees will cover the costs of ongoing CBP inspection activities that are now supported through taxpayer funds. This user fee rate update will allow us to recover the costs from those that benefit from the services associated with importing goods into the country, while minimizing impacts to U.S. employment and the economy.

This is the first major adjustment to AQI fees in nearly 10 years. Other than minor adjustments for inflation from FY 2000-FY 2010, the fee rates have not changed even though the program has hired several hundred additional inspectors and incurred other costs to meet the increasing need caused by a large increase in arriving international passenger and cargo traffic.

Having adequate revenues means that the AQI program will have the financial stability it needs to continue the critical work of keeping U.S. agriculture safe and productive. The proposal will be available for a 60-day comment period and APHIS will consider all comments as it works to finalize the changes to the fees.

Importation and interstate movement of fruits and vegetables:

APHIS publishes final rule to expand notice-based process

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) is expanding its use of a notice-based process for approving fruits and vegetables for importation into the United States. This will help APHIS achieve USDA’s goal of reducing regulations by eliminating the need for rule-making to approve fruits and vegetables for import. This action does not in any way compromise the rigor of APHIS’ analysis for potential plant pest risks, nor our safeguarding efforts. Instead, it will streamline procedures and help to reduce the time it takes to approve commodities for entry into the United States. This change will also allow us to focus regulatory resources, which would otherwise be consumed with the lengthy rule-making process, on other critical priorities.

APHIS Compliance fruit & vegetables
APHIS Compliance fruit & vegetables

Previously, APHIS required proposed and final rules to allow a new commodity access to the U.S. market. In 2007, APHIS began using a notice-based process for approving fruits and vegetables for importation on a limited basis. Since then, a number of commodities have been safely introduced into the United States under this procedure. Moving forward, APHIS will use the notice-based process for approving all new fruits and vegetables for importation. That means, APHIS will issue a notice to announce a new fruit or vegetable for importation and publish a pest risk assessment in the Federal Register for public comment. APHIS will carefully consider all comments received and announce a decision to allow a new fruit or vegetable entry into the United States in a subsequent Federal Register notice.

The science-based process for assessing risk and mitigation remains the same. APHIS will continue to prepare economic documentation for all notices. The public is also still able to submit comments on the pest risk assessment, which will be available for review and comment for a minimum of 60 days when it is posted in the Federal Register.

APHIS will make similar revisions to its regulations for the interstate movement of fruits and vegetables from Hawaii and U.S. territories to align them with the new process for the importation of new fruits and vegetables.

When the final rule is implemented, the Fresh Fruits and Vegetables Manual WILL NO LONGER BE AVAILABLE. All content regarding entry requirements for fresh fruits and vegetables as well as additional information containing language currently housed in 7 CFR 319.56 will be in the FAVIR Database only. You can access the FAVIR database here. For access to additional APHIS import and export manuals please visit the APHIS Plant Protection and Quarantine manuals web page here.

For more information:
APHIS Plant Export Information
Tel: 301-851-2309
Email: PPQExportServices@aphis.usda.gov
www.aphis.usda.gov


APHIS analyses risks associated with importing carrots from Republic of Korea

The US Department of Agriculture’s APHIS Compliance fruit & vegetables Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has prepared and is accepting comments on a pest risk analysis (PRA) regarding the importation of fresh carrots from the Republic of Korea into the United States.

After thorough analysis, APHIS scientists determined carrots from Korea can be safely imported into the United States with the application of one or more of the phytosanitary measures outlined in the PRA.

Source: aphis.usda.gov

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